Financial Times Positions Blue Prism as Robotics Leader Pioneering the Second Machine Age - Blue Prism
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Financial Times Positions Blue Prism as Robotics Leader Pioneering the Second Machine Age

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Financial Times Positions Blue Prism as Robotics Leader Pioneering the Second Machine Age

In a recent article, White-collar robots roll into schools, hospitals and offices, reporter Hannah Kuchler of the Financial Times explores how robots are increasingly emerging in schools, hospitals and offices to. Sharing examples of companies pioneering the robotics charge, Kuchler highlights how Blue Prism’s robotic automation software is revolutionizing back office processes by reducing costs and increasing efficiency. She cites CEO Alastair Bathgate, who explains that Blue Prism’s software robots can be trained to do the work of tens of thousands of back office employees, freeing up human workers to focus on roles that require empathy, human intelligence, sympathy, creativity and entrepreneurialism.

For the full article, see this link or check out the excerpt below:

But some robots come in less robot-like shapes. Blue Prism, a UK-based company that works for the back office of customers including Barclays and the Co-operative Bank, sells a robot that looks just like automated software. What makes it a robot is that it fills in forms and uses computer systems just like a human, without any extra changes to the IT platform.

Alastair Bathgate, chief executive, says robots can be trained to do the work of tens of thousands of back office employees. Clients can still have a human answering the phone, but when they take down the details of someone’s lost credit card, for example, they can pass the form-filling to a robot.

“This is not about a load of P45s [the form given to UK workers when they lose their jobs]; it is about reallocating costs,” he says.

Robots, he adds, are not very good at apologising to customers, but are more accurate than humans at completing the paperwork. “They cannot replicate empathy, human intelligence, sympathy, creativity or entrepreneurialism, but they can carry out humdrum activities.”